Although generally ten degrees cooler here than in Boston, today it’s 92 and four degrees warmer than the city. Very humid on top of that. Would be great to have the air conditioning in (notwithstanding I assured Beth we didn’t need it). They guys have been working away on that and on the new dormer underneath of which goes the upstairs bath.

The dormer is the most dramatic update. We’re sprinting to get the bath done for guests next week. (Note air handler on porch, destined for cellar.)

IMG_1690.jpg

The bath is all framed and sheathed and was getting plumbed yesterday.

IMG_1695.jpg

We had an extra plumber working on this while Scotty, our main guy, worked on getting the air handler into the cellar. Now all ready for rough plumbing inspection tomorrow, after which the fixtures can go in.

IMG_1720.jpg

As an aside, the new plumber was very impressed with our tub and pointed out that it’s circa 1912.

IMG_1700.jpg

The bulky air handler was a bear to wrestle down our cellar…stairs? ladder? hybrid. But it’s now in place and ready to power up, tie into the hot water from the boiler and ultimately to the duct work. There will be an AC unit outside as well, in fact two, because all this gets replicated upstairs as well in the odd space vacated by the old tub. More on that in future episodes.

IMG_1725.jpg

I hadn’t realized the extent of the build up of dirt over the decades on the floor in the basement. They cleared it all out and revealed an ancient stone floor underneath. I’d like to figure out when this all went in as part of my forensics on the history of the structure.

IMG_1726.jpg

The other piece of excitement this weekend was the stuffed-up outflow pipe between the house and the leach field. I wish I had images from the high-def camera that they sent down to identify the hang up. Turned out to be a couple of misaligned pipes where there has been 20 feet of old iron left in between newish PVC runs. Odd. The rubber collar that tied the joint together had keep the connection sealed, but the PVC had sunk a couple inches lower than the older, more stable iron pipe, thus creating a significant impediment to the outflow.

IMG_1683.jpg

Our landscape guy cut through the mess very quickly and in half a day had replaced about a forty foot run. He was so quick, in fact, that I missed getting any pictures after this before.

IMG_1702.jpg

My big concern is with the American Linden through the roots of which the old pipe ran. The tree was already distressed and this contributed. Losing this old beauty would be a true tragedy. We have guys from Save a Tree on the case. Fingers crossed.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s